Dear ________:

Since the start of summer, every time I go to Prospect Park I get lost. The scenery in front of my eyes doesn’t match up with my memory: what was bleak during winter is now filled with all shades of green, and the large trees that once served as landmarks have now taken on a different contour and bearing. Casper said that nature is always changing. And I think back to when it was all wintry and cold here a few months ago, when strolling in the snow felt like walking in Levitan’s Russian landscape paintings. Is this exuberant summer’s day as ephemeral as dewdrops or flashes of lightning? After all, modern science and philosophy appear to be founded on the ruins of certainty: any concrete image or concept is merely a fleeting illusion, whereas objects, thoughts, or humans are all dynamic processes. In fact, I’ve heard how the difference in scale between an electron and an atom is like the difference between an apartment and the whole of Manhattan, of how the rest is just empty, just energy. At the very limit where the flat bottom of a glass meets the surface of a table, particles invisible to the eye are hurtling about, rendering that boundary between the glass and the table radically and yet undetectably tremulous…(excerpt)

 

入夏以来,我去Prospect Park总会迷路,记忆对不上眼前的风景,冬天疏落的现在都被深深浅浅的绿色填满,对我来说具有地标意义的大树也改变了轮廓和神态。小虎说,大自然就是一直在变的。我想起几个月前这里天寒地冻,在雪中散步一如Levitan凄冷的油画。这生机盎然的夏日是否也如露如电?现代科学与哲学似乎都建立在确定性坍塌后的废墟之上:固定的形象或概念都是一时一刻的幻觉,事物或思想或人都是动态的进程。我听说电子和原子的比例如同一间公寓和整个曼哈顿,其余竟是空旷——除了能量。在玻璃杯底和桌子接触的表面,看不到的粒子在空旷中大开大闔地奔跑着,让玻璃杯和桌子的分界线激烈而又难以觉察地颤抖着… (节选)

 

Published on Randian / 燃点

With help of Sang Tian, english translation by Daniel Ho

worn 燃点xiao

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Prix de Print No. 20: Time Machine for Abandoned Futures by Colin Lyons

by Chang Yuchen

Printmaking is about traces. A fingerprint on a dusty desk, a childhood scar on your knee, a transparent area on a frosted window left by a warm breath; printmaking is about something once here and no longer.

Traces are inevitable. Flowing water changes the shape of pebbles and coastlines, people live and then disappear. They leave artifacts behind, with which we speculate and imagine their owners’ existence, constructing an image of our past.

The artist using a metal detector searching through dredge tailings near Bonanza Creek.
Artifacts in museums attract me like a magnet. I stare and stare, sometimes without reflecting on what the object is, merely trying to keep my eyes affixed to it. There’s always a feeling of potential, as if something vital is about to reveal itself in the rusty surface, but just not yet. It is as if we—the artifact and I—will both vanish in loneliness as soon as I turn my eyes away.

Rust and erosion, and wrinkles, too. These traces are loaded with information, with the dimensions of places and histories. They whisper stories rich in texture. We desire stories, always and forever. “Rather than your face as a young woman, I prefer your face as it is now. Ravaged,” says the lover in Marguerite Duras’ autobiographical novel.1

The roof-top battery composed of etching plates and acid.
“In the essay,” Adorno writes, “concepts do not build a continuum of operations, thought does not advance in a single direction, rather the aspects of the argument interweave as in a carpet. The fruitfulness of the thoughts depends on the density of this texture.”2

Printmakers tend to plan ahead, to be nevertheless flexible, to enjoy physical labor, and to be drawn to the subtle. Printmaking is a kind of education, that is to say, a means to an end (I forgot my high school math long ago but I am a better problem solver because of those endless homework problems I did at 16). Like a tunnel full of experiences and satisfactions, it leads to wide-open space at the end. Printmaking is a manner of practice, respectful and committed, and the form of the outcome is free.

Electrolytic cleaning of rust from the scavenged artifacts.
Every work of art includes the activity of performance; whichever medium it takes. There are always decisions, actions and reactions, composition and improvisation. The artist is walking, seeking, collecting materials and treating them with (critical) affection. Artists expose themselves in the field of discourse and feelings, as dancers measure and manifest gravity in their movements.

“Gold Rush.” It is an historical event but also a kind of poetry. The words, joined together, suggest a flood of glittering, molten metal—incredibly beautiful but also horrifying, seductive and destructive.

The requirement of contemporary art: something new, something old, something to look at, something to talk about.

The requirement of the heart: care.

 

Published on Art in Print, Volume 6, Number 4

With the help of Susan Tallman.

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

From New Woodcut to the No Name Group: Resistance, Medium and Message in 20th-Century China

by Chang Yuchen

 

Prints in general, and woodcuts in particular, are frequently touted as a political art form par excellence—expressive, inexpensive, easily distributed and visually accessible. In European history printmaking was the upstart form of the Reformation and of all sorts of subsequent anti-authoritarian movements, from Mexico to South Africa. But what happens when the woodcut is adopted as the mandatory vehicle of authority? What happens to the instrument of the proletariat under a centrally administered dictatorship of the proletariat?

The New Woodcut Movement (新木刻运动) that gained momentum during the 1912–1949 Republic of China strove for popular relevance, made its mark on history and has been well-studied; the No Name Group (无名画会), which operated in secret during the Cultural Revolution, abjured print for painting, and adopted anonymity and privacy as both a philosophical goal and a necessary stratagem of survival. For New Woodcut artists, the print’s process, history and potential social utility made it an ideal art form; for the No Name Group, these same qualities made it anathema. Both were responses to, and reactions against, the political and social situations of their time. (excerpt)

 

Published on Art in Print, Volume 6, Number 1.

With the help of Susan Tallman.

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

刘张访谈 | 常羽辰:传译无形的风

2016-02-14

撰文、采访 / 刘张铂泷

 

刘张:先介绍一下自己吧。

常:我叫常羽辰,是艺术家。我本科在中央美院摄影系,毕业以后去了芝加哥艺术学院读版画系,现在在纽约。

刘张:你在美院的时候做的摄影作品是什么样的呢?

常:我当时在设计学院,第一年基础课,第二年要选专业。那时候19岁,不太知道自己想要干什么,但我知道我不想做平面,不想做时装,不想做首饰,最后就剩下摄影,所以就选了摄影。我记得我们的第一个作业,黑白冲放,我第一次理解了放大也是一次曝光,时间长度和曝光程度成正比。我剪了两个纸片儿,一个是蝴蝶的躯干,一个是蝴蝶的翅膀,就把两个纸片放在放大机上,翅膀曝光几秒钟再换一个位置曝几秒钟,做出来就是有点动态的意思。那个时候并不知道莫霍利-纳吉,不知道曼·雷。

刘张:这个作品是一张?

常:对,就像是动作留下来的影子。是个很稚嫩的尝试,后来也了解到物影摄影这样的创作方法。但从那个时候开始我就不自觉地追求一种sequence,追求叙事。我总觉得一张照片对我来说是不够的。所以后来在摄影系做的绝大多数作业都是书,总是不能拍一张,我必须得拍一堆,然后把它们组织起来。到最后就做了视频。

刘张:听你这样说我倒觉得物影摄影和版画在过程上很相似。

常:据说美院的摄影系就是从版画系来的,制作的过程是很相似的。底片和相纸,铜版和纸之间的正负转化关系,包括版数之类的很多概念都是相通的。

刘张:所以你从一开始做摄影就已经挺偏离正统的摄影了。

常:对。我从没要把自己奉献给摄影,后来也没有想过要奉献给版画。有一些想法在脑子里,要到这个物质世界来,它可以在相纸上,但有的时候在别的东西上。其实我父亲也做摄影。他本身是画油画的,他在成长的时候画的是一种特别纯洁的东西,苏联契斯加科夫体系,这个培训的最终目标就是画Revolutionary Realism。等他真正开始创作的时候这个时代已经过去了,他发现周围的现实这么激烈,怎么还能去画那些呢,他就去拍照和做纪录片了。他觉得不能不拍,正在发生的一切太需要被纪录下来了。

刘张:这可能是摄影对社会有所贡献的一面吧,可能做所谓艺术摄影更多的不是直接反映现实问题。

常:但也不一定只有那种传统的纪实才能“反映问题”。或者说有些问题是不能被“直接反映”的。就像康定斯基说的,我现在画的不是外面的现实,画的是内在的现实。他觉得他画的也是现实,不过是灵魂,是节奏,是一般来说不可见的。“超现实主义”是比现实更现实的意思,是潜意识。对他们来说那些扭曲的形象和空间,能够揭露的人与世界的关系比纪实摄影更深刻,更接近本质。艺术摄影,或者所有媒介的当代艺术,都可以反映现实,甚至反映社会,如果你用历史唯物的眼光去看待它们的话。

刘张:那你自己的创作是更偏向外在的还是内在的现实呢?

常:我觉得不需要陷入这种二元对立。以历史唯物的角度去看,就算我在表现我的内在我也必然会体现我的环境,“我”是一个社会的症状,时代的产品。我的创作关心我自己,极其关心,尽最大力量关心,对我来说这就是关心人类。

刘张:有没有你比较喜欢的摄影艺术家呢?

常:上学的时候看过Duane Michals的作品,他的照片都是sequence,大概6,7张一组,讲一件事,有点像电影。最近在日本买了一本筱山纪信的《晴れた日》,记录1974年他所经历的,看到的。挺贵,又沉,犹豫了很久还是买了,觉得以后哪天会想再翻一翻。不用去琢磨每一个画面,有点心不在焉似的翻阅,像回忆一些遥远零碎的事件。

刘张:Duane Michals的东西叙事性很强,你当时做的也是叙事性的作品吗?

常:对,我当时做的视频都是有叙事的。不过我觉得用照片叙事和用视频叙事区别还是很大的。一张照片最重要的特征就是没有来龙去脉,没有前没有后,1/250秒,是时间里非常薄的一个薄片儿,那之前之后可能发生了很多事。就算他的6张照片是一个连续的动作,还是有一种很强烈的频闪的感觉,中间是有黑屏的。这是它的魅力所在,它是有空间的。

刘张:你现在主要就做版画吗?

常:也没有就只做版画,也做别的。我这两年反而对摄影有一点感觉了。以前就是喜欢不起来。最近几年有看到一些喜欢的摄影作品,比如我一个朋友拍的。有一个日本摄影师(山本昌男)很像他,去年出了一本书叫Small Things in Silence。我目前对摄影的认识,最核心,是伤感,它想留住已经失去的,或者注定失去的。是人在时空变幻的洪流里一个微弱的抵抗。在小津的电影里,每次出现合影的情节,接下去就会是分离。但也不能说照片什么都没留下。留下的是什么呢,有点神秘,这一点神秘已经足够让人沉溺。

刘张:你在13年做的Rose这个作品,你说最开始想把它印到纸上,但后来没有印,只把版展出来了。你刚才说到摄影的这种无效的伤感,让我想到了这个作品,它有一种伤感的气质在里面。

常:版画这个媒介是基于伤害。是铜表面的损失和伤疤构成了最终的画面。负形被显现。玫瑰这个作品没有印,直接展示了这种伤害。

刘张:为什么选择做玫瑰呢?

常:有的作品的产生有说得清楚理由,这个好像没有。突然想到就做了。但事后我会分析自己为什么做这个,可能是版画有一个厚度,它适合做蛇是因为蛇的鳞片那种微妙的起伏感和版画有一点关系,玫瑰花瓣的层次感也有一些联系。媒介的物理过程和对象本身的形态是有关系的。另外,玫瑰的形象是青春娇美的,但也有一种霸气,为什么我们会形容花朵“怒放”。 当她被腐蚀、耗损,破坏,这种矛盾更剧烈。

刘张:你说Fingerprint(指纹)这个作品“它并不坚固,不能抵抗改变,短暂,孱弱和健忘”,给我的感觉有点像摄影和版画的结合,但它最终又具有雕塑的特征。

常:在北京展览的时候也有一个朋友说《指纹》像摄影。可能因为我刻下了一个往往会被擦掉的痕迹,记录了微小,留住了短暂的。Robert Bresson说“传译无形的风,是靠它路過水面所刻之纹”。

刘张:那你是怎么想到开始做声音的作品的呢?

常:我觉得做声音对我来说几乎是一种飞行的感觉。做摄影,做版画,我看过太多图像了,我脑子里面有美术史。开始做声音的时候,我觉得一下子离开地面了。我有一个很好的老师,叫Nicolas Collins。当然后来也了解了声音艺术的历史,但还是很不一样。它一开始就是抽象的,完全不同的方法。

刘张:我听过一些实验音乐的表演,就我听过的来说,他们是对设备或者各种不同效果的尝试,注重的不是人本身的作用。我觉得你的声音作品很有意思的是有人的气息在里面,比如说呼吸声,跟我之前听过的声音表演不太一样。

常:我以前去过一个panel discussion,4个声音艺术家,其中有吹小号的,吹萨克斯风的,有玩program的,我提问说能不能请你们谈谈你们和你们的器材之间的关系。吹萨克斯风的老头叫Roscoe Mitchell, 芝加哥先锋爵士的领袖。他说我花了一辈子时间研究吹萨克斯风还可以产生什么声音,我一直在探索和拓展它的边界。做program的是我的老师,Shawn Decker,他说program可以产生任何声音,他一直在试图限制他能产生的声音,试图找到一个边界。我觉得我也是把人当成一个器材,人本身会产生很多的声音。我记得John Cage写他去哈佛大学访问,他们有号称世界上最高级的录音室,那个房间应该是绝对的静。但John Cage说他听到了两种声音,一个比较高,一个比较低。他问管理录音室的人说怎么我还是听到声音了,管理员说,高的是你的神经系统在运作,低的是你的血液循环。其实人的身体一直在产生声音,只不过没有机会听到。

刘张:那你为什么会选择用电子的方式来处理自己的声音呢?

常:我不会什么乐器。现在用的这个program叫MAX/MSP,它是我唯一会用的“乐器”。我觉得它是离人最远的声音。那些物理的乐器,比如说打鼓,鼓膜的震动和耳膜的震动是相对应的关系。但是MAX的声音可以是物理世界没有对应的,抽象的,更接近我刚才说的“飞行”。

刘张:我想起来以前看过的一个艺术家的录像作品,他先是在画廊里面一边跑一边喊,后来是在一个没有建完的空的建筑里一边跑一边喊。他也是把人本身当做一个乐器或者说发声的工具。

常:其实这个和摄影还有版画恰恰相反,摄影的人在机器后面,版画的人在版子那边,他离成品很远。但在我的声音或者表演艺术里面,身体是在战场上的,在前线的。

刘张:这样来说你走了两个很极端的路子,一个是很隐藏人的存在,一个是把人放在最前面的。你说现在对摄影有感觉了有想过拿摄影做些什么吗?

常:我最近开始用Instagram,以前没有用过。在过去近两年时间里我几乎没有用任何的social media,最近渐渐开始用了。我想试试拿他们能干什么。在读书的时候我有划线的习惯,然后我就会用Instagram把它拍下来,上传。Instagram是一个看图的地方,我不知道文字放上去会怎么样。

刘张:这个让我想到了你做的The History of All Hitherto Existing Society那个作品,我自己做过一个有关文字和图像关系的视频,是用Google作为索引,但是把决定权完全交出去,像一个编码的过程。但是你的这个作品还是有很强的人的存在感。最近有做影像类的作品吗?

常:有,其实还是The History of All Hitherto Existing Society那个作品,我想做一个视频版本的,因为觉得有的展览场合不太适合声音。我现在录的这个素材很静止,它的重点还是声音,只是给你的眼睛一个休息的地方。就好像初学打坐要集中精神想一个东西,不能直接什么都不想。所以我就给人一个画面先看着,然后再来听。克鲁格说眼睛是感官的帝国主义,的确,人们很习惯视觉相较于其他感官的强势。

刘张:这个作品为什么选择《共产主义宣言》作为创作的文本来源呢?

常:这个作品就是因为读到这个文本才产生的。我中学的时候政治课很好,尤其是辩证唯物法那些哲学原理的部分,那种思维的结构性特别吸引我。后来在芝加哥上学我发现我会特别有感觉的作者,本雅明,布莱希特,居德波,阿多诺,无一例外地深受马克思主义的影响。他们的逻辑我特别熟悉,有时候觉得简直能预感下一句话往哪说,读的感觉,好像是回到了一个从没去过的家。在这段时间第一次读到了《共产主义宣言》。我很震动:它对我来说那么熟悉,又那么陌生。它的语言那么的有魅力,它的纲领那么的激进,它是那么的年轻,生猛,充满希望,然而我们都深深地知道尝试把它付诸实践曾造成的失望和悲剧。我们的教育中没有强调原文或原旨的。比如说,江姐,她理解资本论吗?可能不。她那种牺牲精神更像是古老的殉道,基于一种类似宗教的迷信。

我以一种渐变的方式朗读《共产主义宣言》,从英文开始,从中文结束。它的语法极其紧致,也是因为这个它的逻辑那么强悍。我想保留这种语法,所以先换掉名词,代词,尽量保留介词,连词,直到不再能保留,旧的语法坍塌,新的语法建立。距离感,理论与现实的距离,东方与西方的距离,历史与当下的距离,翻译难以跨越的语言之间的距离以至思维的距离。。这些感受催生了这个作品。我用一种非常单纯和舒缓的方式表达这种张力。我把它们拉近,在我身上重叠,又越来越远。

 

原载于瑞像馆

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

常羽辰谈自身创作

2015.10.18

文/ 采访/郭娟

 

常羽辰是目前生活和工作在纽约一位年轻艺术家曾就读于中央美院摄影系和芝加哥艺术学院版画系她作品中使用的媒介包括版画声音影像等在她的创作中可以看到她对质地和节奏的敏感而她的教育背景日常经验阅读及思考则使得她在实践中逐渐形成了对如何在当代做一个艺术家的个人观点近期常羽辰的个展野蛮诗歌正在北京的Between艺术实验室展出

我对铜版画有一种天然亲近的感觉这几年做版画很难说是一个有明确自觉的选择而仅仅是因为每一天醒来都想去版画工作室我的时间都愿意在那里度过铜版是一种凹刻想要呈现在纸上的线条和块面首先要在铜版上损失掉有点类似老子说的有之以为利无之以为用”。是表面的损毁那些负的形象最终显现构成了画面这是版画的物理机制是它作为一个媒介自身的逻辑也许我原本就更在意失去的欲言又止的不在场的而做版画的劳动过程契合我这样的倾向。《这个作品是关于痕迹的也可以说它是某种形态的历史

我也做书这和我以前做视频有关——它们都是有序列的信息在时间中展开只不过翻阅一本书是一种更私人的放映”。艺术家书被索尔·勒维特(Sol LeWitt)等观念艺术家引入当代艺术的语境因为它比油画更民主能接触到更广泛的人民群众然而露西·利帕德(Lucy Lippard)1970年代曾在文章中承认这一乌托邦式理想的失败人民群众似乎并不需要那么多艺术艺术家书终究仍是小众的尽管我对美术史以及它所牵连的更广泛的历史有强烈的求知欲在创作的时候却更多地依赖直觉对我来说一个想法产生要进入这个物理世界变成一件作品它会有一个较为合适的出口有时是书有时是别的有时它应当印数庞大有时则应当珍贵

声音是在芝加哥的时候开始做的因为认识了一个很好的导师,Nicolas Collins。我以视觉的方式理解声音艺术就像绘画在塞尚之后逐渐放弃了对象叙事),声音在约翰·凯奇之后放弃了旋律情节),留下的是结构质感如同抽象画中的形状与颜色音乐的感情较易理解而对声音的欣赏需要一些聆听经验近几次的演出我都用到了呼吸——它是身体的声音时时刻刻都在发生然而往往被忽略我用接触式麦克风和MAX/MSP把它逐渐放大复制扭曲和重叠以至渔阳鼙鼓动地来一般地激烈这个作品是一个现场的表演这一点和版画相反——版画的制作者永远在后台我珍惜现场表演的机会在那几分钟里我会进入一个表演者的状态比平时更专注是一个非常态的体验

在芝加哥读研究生的两年比较系统地认识了二十世纪以来此起彼伏的艺术运动以及在这条轴线上我们今天的位置所谓当代”。然而在下课后和假期的旅行中我在博物馆里贪婪地流连忘返于维米尔戈雅甚至埃及壁画前以复辟者一般坚决而又伤感的心情在古老的艺术中体会着胸口的共鸣在这两种几乎背道而驰的教育中我发觉我的革命意志如此不坚定我向往那种悠远的雅致对于形态与节奏极致地追求在这种追求中事物的表面成为了寓言艺术家对材料的控制上升为哲学尽管这向往显得有些不合时宜我确实反复问过自己较之一个革命性的艺术家我更愿做一个真正的艺术家革命在我的认识里只是一片随着时移势易而变换的光影

以这种状态住在纽约好像也有些矛盾过去的一段时间里我在最热闹的都市过着荒岛一般离群索居的生活但我喜欢纽约的强度地铁里有真正希绪弗斯一般悲壮的疯子在餐厅打工的经历也让我见识了hardcore的资本主义作为异乡人的每一天都像是感光度更高的底片一样更敏感捕捉到更多信息也很有可能有一天我不再需要这些就会回来试着建立一种更稳定的生活

 

原载于艺术论坛

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

常羽辰的私人放映

2014.03.23

编辑 / 何京闻

 

无论:

你会怎么形容你的作品给从来没有见过这些作品的人呢?

常羽辰:

我不知道,我可以谈过程,或是感受,好像很难去形容作品本身。我不完全信任语言,不信任描述或形容的动作。“如人以手,指月示人”,语言是指月的手指而不是月亮。如果可能我想呈现天上的月亮,而不是地上的我的手。我想创造一种可以被直接感受的情景,而不是它们在语言中的倒影。

无论:

能具体谈一谈你的“蛇”系列的创作理念吗?

常羽辰:

蛇的系列是2012年开始的。起因是做另一本书的时候买了很多本子来裁纸,裁过之后留下了很多窄长的纸边,拿着这些窄长的纸片想能用它们做些什么呢,就开始画小蛇了。先是用铅笔和橡皮,画了一本多的时候我渐渐觉得蛇的皮肤可以是任何纹样和笔触的容器,尤其当反反复复地描画和擦除,那种损毁后留下的痕迹似乎能唤起对于真的蛇皮的印象:长时间、重复性的磨损,视觉上的结果不是减法而是加乘,也许因为有了更多中间和暧昧的层次,甚至时态的变化。

这样接着想到了用铜版来做,因为我对铜版画这个媒介的理解也是这样的,是反反复复地动作留下的痕迹,以损伤作为一种书写的方式。蚀刻,干刻,包括从金属到纸张的转译,种种可控不可控最终构成了蛇。从头到尾,大约一年的时间里它对我来说越来越抽象,越来越下沉,沉到比思想更深的地方,语言失效的地方了。它是无数笔画,也是一个笔画;是千言万语,也是沉默。

最终的成品有三种,一种在BFK Rives上,一种在桑皮纸(Mulberry Paper)上, 第三种,也就是在否画廊这次展出的,是BFK纸印出来之后装订成一本风琴书。做为风琴书的蛇是同时具有断裂和连续两种性质的。在翻阅的过程中,没有首尾的提示,它是更加单纯的表面:也是风蚀的地面,或者振动的水面。

无论:

你最近的作品大部份都与纸和书有关,为什么呢?

常羽辰:

嗯。其实以前做过一段时间的视频,还有动画。屏幕上的图像是没有厚度的,它们漂浮和发亮。但我越来越被有厚度的事物吸引,真实的物件,在真实的空间中,有重量,厚度,和我们的身体同样受到物理的限制。我后来学习了铜版画,从金属到纸张这种深入浅出的制作过程满足了我:对铜版大肆破坏的过程在最终都被隐去了,只有这种伤害的痕迹留在了纸上。这些痕迹,有不易察觉但确凿存在的深度,是触感。也许与视频、动画这样比较新的媒体相比,纸、书这样的“老媒体”更与身体有关,与他们工作让我觉得亲密,沉静,甚至更敏感了。

其实艺术家书和视频对我而言有一些交集:它们都占据时间的维度,并且信息的出现有规定的序列。只是翻阅的过程是更私人的“放映”。以书为媒介的作品,可以被人揣在口袋里,带到公园去看,带到地铁里去看,而不一定要在画廊这样特别的场所被观看。我喜欢这种星星之火的交流方式。

无论:

那你平时都看什么类型的书?最近在看什么书?

常羽辰:

看书挺杂的。感兴趣的东西很多。不过这两年有个变化就是看书越来越慢了。最近一直在看Reaktion出版社1994年出的一本Essay合集,The Culture of Collection. 作者包括Baudrillard等等十几个不同领域的学者,从精神分析学、社会学和现象学等不同的角度来考察收集这个行为。比如序言里把诺亚看做第一个收集者,在洪水来临之前召集和命名每一种动物,收集的本质是存留,是对消逝和毁灭的抵抗;Baudrillard的那篇谈到人的收集癖好在12岁之前(小钢珠,小画片)和50岁之后(汽车,奢侈品)出现顶峰,而这两个年龄段分别是性欲发展和衰退的关键时期,由此谈到收集这个行为中的潜意识;还有一篇谈罗马帝国的税收政策与它的覆灭的关联:有效的收集机制需要科学的分级、规则、标签、系统,而这些结构正是国家机器的心脏。

收集也是现在艺术方法中越来越重要的一种。很多人收集生活中现成的图像或声音,赋予它们某种逻辑而进行创作。收集者最终是在世界的碎片中拼凑自己,我想,因为现实世界的卷帙浩繁、混乱无序以及不可重复性几乎是不能被接受、甚至不能被想象的,所以我们迫切需要人为地截取、排列、占有,以这些疆界确认自身的存在。好像是挑选一些材料捏一座自己的塑像吧。

无论:

从北京到芝加哥,然后再到纽约,这三个地方对你的创作有什么样的影响?

常羽辰:

从北京到芝加哥让我变得安静了,孤独让我成年了,创作也更加向内。纽约又让我有点躁了,但好像和以前的躁不一样。搬到纽约之后生活上面临很多实际的困难,打工要占用一些时间,并且离开学校就用不到很多设备了,包括空间。这些不便利的条件让我常常问自己,这件事对我来说到底是什么,为什么,是不是非做不可。

无论:

在不久的将来,你希望在你的作品或主题上探索哪些领域?

常羽辰:

嗯。对以后的创作我没什么规划,媒介或主题上都没有。更多时候我听信直觉去开始一个新项目,在做的过程中倾听它,在完成之后理解它。也许几年之后退远了看,能看到一些创作之间的联系,递进或是转折,但我允许自己暂时认不清大局。

 

原载于無論Whatever

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Exhibition Review: Chang Yuchen, Snake and Others at Fou Gallery

2014/2/11

Text/ Qiu Yelin

 

It was the day after the opening when I visited CHANG Yuchen’s solo exhibition at Fou Gallery, a little gem of a gallery under the disguise of an apartment in residential Prospect Heights. It was much quieter than the well-attended opening night, I was told. I consider myself fortunate because Ms. Chang’s works are in fact better enjoyed alone, in silence.

The centerpiece is a large accordion-bound etching album of a snake, or rather a serpentine abstraction. Each album leaf works well simply as a detailed study of a tree trunk or a scaly alien landscape, complete with certain chiaroscuro-like effect, signs of vegetation on the surface, and sheer indulgence in lines of all lengths and thicknesses. It would be easy to get lost in the lines if not for the airy composition, on each page and seen together. The entire album, sitting delicately upright on the folds, turns out to be a balancing act: an exercise in abstraction and figuration, in indul- gence and restraint.

The parallel between the artist’s process and the snake motif is revealing. The act of etching entails repeated erosion over a long period of time on the copper plate, while on paper, etching produces a string of intermediate works, constantly renewed, ever approximating the eventual work. Erosion is renewal in this medium; so is it in the skin shedding of a snake. It is nonetheless a melancholic process, with old skins and intermediate works piling up, only to be discarded in the wake of the eventual work. It is through the relentless act of forgetting that the final work manages to remember. The earlier traces are hidden beneath the later ones, only to be detected by the delicate souls, in the faint-hearted vibrations yet epic narratives of those lines. Thus the work is not as quiet as it appears; it whispers to those who are willing to listen. It is therefore not surprising to hear Ms. Chang citing influence from Walter Benjamin, who wrote down the following passage on a Paul Klee work, Angelus Novus:

“This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastro- phe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. The storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.” (Walter Benjamin, Theses on the Philosophy of History)

The snake motif took on the pencil-on-paper form in a body of smaller works. Tucked comfortably in wood boxes, in the shelf space under the window sill, these snake drawings occupy similar metaphorical space as the etching: repeated erasure and layering of pencil lines. Somehow the defined lines, the lower display level – well below waist level, and the small size of it all render the works more silent and cute than anything else; their psychological impact pales in comparison to their monumental counterpart.

At another side of the gallery wall, the Bonsai series and the newly commissioned work, Fingerprint offered much to ponder upon regarding the artist’s versatility and aesthetic tendencies. Each of the five pencil-drawings of bonsai plants is placed in a rather precarious composition: slightly off-center, faintly too low, leaving just a bit too much white on top or at a certain corner, etc. The result is an irresistible allure at the psychological level that pulls us just close enough to the painter’s indulgent world of lines. As she says, “The gesture, contour and presentation of the plant areWhen the artist delves into three dimensional works in Fingerprint– fivefingerprint engravings on glass based on artist’s right hand mounted on small wax bases, one start to discern brand new motifs. The curves on the fingerprints marked the cold hard glass surface, while the soft-contoured wax columns embrace the sharp edges of the glass fragments. The act of mark making – often associated with softerorganic and malleable materials such as wax –is done on a hard surface, yet the very masculine act of erecting monuments – often associated with hard materials such as marble and steel –is done on a soft medium. Hard and soft, masculine and feminine, organic and synthetic… polar opposites neatly approach synthesis in this surprisingly balanced work. Chang’s works on paper delineate certain historicity of lines, and with only one sculptural work on view, one can only guess what her next step is. I’m dying of anticipation already.

 

展评常羽辰:蛇与其他

文:邱烨麟

译:袁奕

 

在常羽辰的个展开幕的第二天我去参观了否画廊,一个宝石般小巧的画廊隐匿在布鲁克林展望高地的居民区中。听说与这天的安静相比,开幕式非常的热闹拥挤。我感到很幸运,常羽辰的作品更适合在静默中独自欣赏。

位于展览中心的是一本铜版印制、风琴书装订的蛇书,或者说,一幅巨蟒般蜿蜒曲折的抽象画。每一页都可以被看成是对树根表面、或是对栉比鳞臻的诡谲地貌的细致研究而独立存在,运用某种近似明暗对照的方式渲染,表面植被布满的痕迹,还有那全然的沉溺——沉溺于线的变化,长短、粗细。如果不是构图的大量留白给空气以流动的余地,观者很容易走失在线的迷阵里,对每一页或是对整体的观看都同样具有这种风险。而整本书轻巧、笔直地倚靠折叠处站立,成为一幕关于平衡的表演:在抽象与具象之间,在沉迷与节制之间。

艺术家创作的过程与作为主旨的蛇之间,有一层具有启示性的平行关系:蚀刻的制作要求对铜版进行长时间、重复性地侵蚀,而在纸上,蚀刻过的铜版留下一连串处于中间状态的印迹,持续地更新,无限地趋近最终的结果。在铜版这个媒介中,消磨就是发展,正如蜕换皮肤的蛇。这同样也是一个感伤的过程,被剥除的陈旧皮肤和中间状态的试印日渐堆叠,最终被丢弃在完成品身后的尾波中。正是通过无情地执行忘记的动作,最终的成品凝固了记忆:旧痕迹隐藏在新痕迹下面,只有灵敏的眼睛才能觉察它们,在犹疑震颤、然而编织成史诗般叙事的线条中。这件作品并不像它看起来的那样安静,它向愿意聆听的人耳语。因此当常羽辰向我谈起本雅明对她的影响时,我毫不惊讶,因为本雅明在讨论保罗克利的《历史天使》时曾写下这样的段落:

这就是人们如何描绘历史天使。他的脸朝向过去。在被我们理解为一系列事件的地方,他只看到一个不停积卷残骸的灾难,将碎片堆积在他脚边。天使想要留下,唤醒亡者,修复那些被粉碎的。然而从天堂刮起一阵风暴,它卷起天使的翅膀,剧烈的力使他无法将翅膀阖上。这难以抗拒的风暴迫使他进入他原本背向的未来,与此同时断壁残垣的墟骸向着天际越堆越高。这风暴就是我们所称的进步。(怀特˙本雅明:《历史哲学论纲》)

蛇的主题也以纸上铅笔的形式出现在一系列尺寸偏小的作品中。它们被放置于尺寸合度的木盒中,窗台下的木架隔层里。这些蛇的素描与铜版画占据着邻近的隐喻空间:铅笔线条重复性地擦除与叠加。然而这些分明的线条,较低的展示高度——远远低于视线,以及较小的尺幅,赋予这些作品更多的安静与亲密;与那纪念碑一般的蛇书相比,它们对于观者心理的震动是微妙的。

画廊另一侧的墙面,《盆栽》系列和最新创作的《指纹》系列,透露了更多研究艺术家创作的多元性及其审美倾向的线索。五幅盆栽的铅笔素描都被安排在相对不稳定的构图中:稍偏离中心,隐约地低于水平线,在顶部或在某一角落留下只是些微多于正常量的空白。这种安排的结果,是产生在观者心理层面的难以抵制的诱惑,去接近画家为线而沉迷的世界。正如常羽辰在自述中所提到的:“线的走向,疏密,规定了这株植物的轮廓,形态,印象。”

当艺术家进入立体的维度,观者可以感受到全然不同的题旨。《指纹》是五片基于艺术家的右手指纹而雕刻的玻璃,镶衬在小的蜡座上。指纹的涡旋被刻画在玻璃冰冷而坚硬的表面,而蜡柱温和的轮廓包容了玻璃碎片锋利的边缘。制造痕迹的动作——常常联系着柔软、有机并且可塑的材料,例如蜡——在此却被施加于坚硬的表面;相反,建造纪念碑这样极其雄性的动作——常常联系着坚不可摧的材料,例如大理石、钢铁——在此却由温吞的媒介完成。硬与软,阳性与阴性,有机与合成……截然相反的两级巧妙地化合在这件平衡的作品中。常羽辰的纸上作品叙写着线的某种历史,而展览中这唯一一件雕塑作品使人难以猜测她的下一步会走向哪里,我非常期待。